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April 2020

Paleoart illustration of Postosuchus eating a fallen Placerias, while three Coelophysis watch.

This Mesozoic Month: April 2020

This Mesozoic Month

Hope you all are staying safe! Here’s this month’s edition of my regular Mesozoic paleontology roundup. We had some really interesting news this April, and as always I provide a look at relevant blogging, videos, and artwork. In the News The SVP has taken a stand on the blood amber of Myanmar, in a letter sent to 300 journals across the globe. “The Society of Vertebrate Paleontology strongly discourages its members from working on amber collected in or exported from…

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Vintage Dinosaur Art: The Great Dinosaur Atlas – Part 1

Vintage Dinosaur Art

Back in the early 1990s, John Sibbick’s artwork for the Normanpedia (that is, 1985’s The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs, authored by David Norman) was simply everywhere. There was no escaping it. Pick up a magazine – Sibbick. Box of chocolate-coated biscuits – Sibbick. Breakfast cereal – Sibbick. Naturally, the ubiquity of Sibbick’s gorgeously painted, but rather idiosyncratic, illustrations from the mid-’80s resulted in a huge number of imitators and outright copycats – there was even a mysterious company apparently named…

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Vintage Dinosaur Art: What Is A Dinosaur – Part 2

Vintage Dinosaur Art

Last time, 65 million years ago, we looked at the marvellous illustrations by the great Maidi Wiebe in Daniel Q. Posin’s book What Is A Dinosaur (no question mark). We ‘ve already covered the theropods, in tried and true LITC fashion, so now it’s time to take a look at all them other dinosaurs. We’re firmly in the 1960’s, so expect lots of swamp dwelling slowpokes… but thanks to the artist’s pedigree, there’s some nice surprises, as well! Here’s a…

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Paleoartist Interview: The Polygonal Prehistory of Kuzim

Interview

When I first spotted the art of Kuzim on Twitter, I was immediately struck by his unique style. “Low poly” is an art style that deliberately invokes the asthetics of early 3D video games. The recent revival of this style has, so far, mostly been the domain of indie video games, but Kuzim has taken this quirky flavour to the prehistoric realm. The bold colour schemes, the dynamic compositions and the deceptive simplicity make him a unique voice among the…

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