Monthly Archives

April 2021

Vintage Dinosaur Art: Dinosaur!

Vintage Dinosaur Art

Although I became interested in dinosaurs before the release of that film in 1993, it was only just before, and as such I’m a tiny bit too young to remember Dinosaur!, a 1991 TV series that featured as consultant none other than sexily shiny-domed Iguanodon expert Dr David Norman. Yes, the very same Dr Norman who wrote the Normanpedia and stared out sultrily in black and white from the back cover of each issue of Dinosaurs! magazine (whether or not…

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Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs: The Podcast promotional graphic featuring a chasmosaurus skull with a microphone

Podcast Show Notes: Episode 5

Podcast Show Notes

The fifth episode of the LITC podcast is here, in which the team ventures off the beaten path into more unusual forms of palaeoart. We discuss a volume of vintage dinosaur art that was ahead of its time in its blending of photography and illustration. For our interview, Natee talks to Rebecca Groom, whose hand-crafted soft toys of underrepresented animals, both living and extinct, have won her many admirers. Featuring rainbows and unicorns and an exclusive poetry reading by Natee.…

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Vintage Dinosaur Art: The Strange World of Dinosaurs – Part 1

Vintage Dinosaur Art

The year is 1964 and, although he doesn’t know it yet, Yale palaeontologist John H. Ostrom is about to make history. In the summer of that year, he will embark on an expedition to Montana where he will make some remarkable discoveries. Five years later, he will be publishing one of the most game-changing papers in the history of dinosaur palaeontology: the scientific description of Deinonychus antirrhopus. It will mark the beginning of a complete revolution in how we see…

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Vintage Dinosaur Art: Dinosaurs (Identifying) – Part 2

Vintage Dinosaur Art

Because I’ll wring two blog posts out of any old thing, here’s another round for 1997’s Dinosaurs, part of the Identifying series from The Apple Press. In my previous post, I mentioned that The Mighty Graham Rosewarne had only contributed a single sauropodomorph (Anchisaurus) to this book. But – as so many people have in the last 20 years – I’d forgotten about Saltasaurus. Naturally, there are certain details we’d change these days, but Rosewarne’s Salty looks very sharp for the…

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