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Troodon

A spread of dinosaur artwork featuring representatives of each major clade.

Vintage Dinosaur Art: Zoobooks Dinosaurs – Part 1

Vintage Dinosaur Art

Who remembers Zoobooks? Beginning in 1980, the richly illustrated and highly authoritative Zoobooks series made a name for itself as some of the very best educational books in the world of children’s publishing. Zoobooks were primarily distributed as mail-in magazines and hardback library copies, though I’ve also seen hardbacks sold at zoo gift shops. Most issues, as you’d expect, covered modern animals in great detail and the one devoted to dinosaurs is no different. Originally published in 1985, it was…

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A skeletal mount of Ceratosaurus chasing Dryosaurus.

Introducing Sophie!

Announcements Uncategorized

There’s a new face on the blog! Sophie has been getting some attention on Twitter with, among other things, her threads on vintage dinosaur books. Of course, it was a matter of time before she found her way here. Please welcome Sophie and come say hi in the comments! – Niels Hi there, everyone! I’m Sophie, you might know me from my Twitter where I’ve made a name for myself with my enormous threads on old dinosaur art, regular commentary…

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Return to Het Dinobos

Attraction Review

I’ve been having a pretty crazy summer, so when a dear friend of mine offered to take me to Dierenpark Amersfoort, a lovely, lush, forested zoo in the town of the same name, I jumped at the chance. Within the zoo is a bit of forest dedicated to dinosaurs: Marc visited for the first time in 2011, and I’ve been a few times as well. I was wondering if anything had changed and how the pandemic measures would affect my…

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Vintage Dinosaur Art: The Great Dinosaur Atlas – Part 2

Vintage Dinosaur Art

As discussed in the previous post, the artist most frequently referenced by Giuliano Fornari in illustrating The Great Dinosaur Atlas was John Sibbick. Specifically, art from the Normanpedia was often quite slavishly copied, right down to particular colour choices. As such, when Fornari shifts gears and opts to, er, pay tribute to the work of other palaeoartists with wildly contrasting styles, the effect is very jarring. Sibbick’s Normanpedia work, while beautifully executed and hugely influential, was also a little retrograde…

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A close-up of the title character of T. Rex's Mighty Roar

Absolutely Not Vintage Dinosaur Art: T. Rex’s Mighty Roar

Vintage Dinosaur Art

One minute you’re browsing the questionable offerings of the Goodwill cookbook section, the next you’re stumbling upon a forgotten bit of a modern master’s paleoart oeuvre. As I scanned the children’s book shelves at one of the thrift store giant’s nearby locations, the title T. Rex’s Mighty Roar (sic) popped out at me. It was a dinosaur title. And that’s just what I was looking for. But it’s very rare that I find something as interesting as this. I mean,…

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Vintage Dinosaur Art: A Field Guide to Dinosaurs – Part 2

Uncategorized Vintage Dinosaur Art

And so we return to yet another book that I hadn’t heard of until recently, but turned out to be a beloved childhood staple for many people. It also contains very little truly original art, with its illustrations being slightly reworked (and sometimes, de-feathered) versions of other artists’ work, when they aren’t outright copies. I know, I know – that sort of thing was accepted more back then. Still, figuring out which artists have ‘inspired’ the work here is entertaining…

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Dinosaurs! Strange and Wonderful cover

Vintage Dinosaur Art: Dinosaurs! Strange and Wonderful

Vintage Dinosaur Art

It seems fitting to look at another 1990s dinosaur book on the blog following (part of) Dinosaurs of the World, and given that there seems to be a resurgence of ’90s-style dinosaurs in popular culture recently for some reason. Dinosaurs! Strange and Wonderful was published in 1995 by Boyds Mills Press, written by Laurence Pringle, illustrated by Carol Heyer, and sent to us by Jordan Waltz. Thanks Jordan! Jordan remarked that “there is something very unique about the airbrush-esque paintings”,…

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